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One of the typical Dutch treats, the herring

Top 5 Dutch treats

5 Dutch Treats Which You Gotta Try in Amsterdam

The Netherlands isn’t that famous for its food in contrast to Italy or France. Perhaps the Dutch are better in making beers. However, there are some Dutch treats which are really really good and a must try when visiting Amsterdam.

  1. Haring. (= herring)

    Dutch painter, Rembrandt van Rijn, had a delicious Dutch treat. He eat herring on the Albert Cuyp market.
    Haring is a fish which is known for it’s salty taste and its high amount of fatty acids. So, you might think it’s not a very healthy snack. Well, actually you’re wrong! These Omega-3 acids are the “good ones” and are essential for the human body, particularly for the brain, skin, eyes, nerves and circulatory system. Another pro is the high concentration of vitamins. To eat the fish traditionally, take this traditional Dutch treat by the tail, add some chopped onion and sliced pickles and lower it down to your mouth. So, to start your day with a boost: Instead of taking your daily vitamin pill after breakfast, have a haring as breakfast!

    Tip from our Dutch local guide:

    My grandfather always said; don’t buy herring on a Monday. He used to say this because the fish auction is always closed on Sunday’s and therefor no fresh fish is delivered on Monday’s.

  2. Stroopwafels (= syrupwaffles)

    Rembrandt van Rijn went to the Albert Cuyp market in Amsterdam and took a selfie.
    Nice sweet waffles with caramelized sugar. You can find these at any supermarket, but they are most tastefull when they’re fresh and warm. You’ll notice this when the syrup is dripping a bit out of the waffle because it’s still fluid. You can buy the fresh ones at markets like the famous Albert Cuyp market in the area “the Pijp”. It’s quite difficult to just eat one stroopwafel. They are just too damn delicious!

    Tip from our Dutch local guide:

    These stroopwafels taste extremely well accompanied with a cup of coffee or tea!

  3. Erwtensoup (= green pea soup)

    Rembrandt van Rijn enjoyed a typical Dutch treat in Amsterdam. A sausage from the HEMA.
    This is a thick soup that is mostly consumed in winter when it’s cold outside and you need a big meal to keep you warm. The Dutch are used to eat the soup with slices of another Dutch delicate in the soup, which is called “rookworst” (=smokey sausage) and a slice of rye bread on the side. If you prefer to try the sausage only, stop by at famous dutch retail shop HEMA. Most shops consist of a food stand where you can order a “halve worst” (=half a smokey sausage). Ask for mustard if you like it more spicey!

    Tip from our Dutch local guide:

    HEMA also offers stroopwafels packed in beautiful Dutch gift boxes. Great as a souvenir.

  4. Kroket (= croquette)

    An acquired taste: A deep fried meaty and crispy snack, that you can have at any snack bar. Or do as the Dutch and get it from a wallmounted machine (don’t ask, you’ll recognize it when you see one). One of the famous wall mounted machine vendors is called FEBO, which serve their own delicous home made kroket. Eat it with some mustard! Or try the kroket at McDonalds, where this Dutch delicate has it’s own burger which is called  “McKroket”.

    Tip from our Dutch local guide:

    I have two favorite croquettes; the veal kroket is my all time favorite, so I’d definitely recommend this one! Another kroket which is truly delicious – is the shrimp croquette.

  5. Poffertjes (= very Dutch, so no translation available…)

    Small sweet pancakes consumed with powdered sugar and butter. Mostly children love this sweet snack. You can order them at Dutch pancake restaurants or buy them at a food stand during a fair. It’s also possible to buy them at a supermarket. Then you only have to put them in the microwave for a couple of seconds and you will be one step further to becoming a real Dutch sugar lover ;). It must be said that the ones from the supermarket aren’t that good as the fresh poffertjes.

    Tip from our Dutch local guide:

    You can also try these poffertjes at one of Amsterdam’s markets. Go to the Dapper Market, Albert Cuyp Market or Noorder Market.

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